FALLING SPRING MILL

Rushing water was the power that turned grain into flour and timber into lumber at the many historic mills that you can visit around West Plains. Some mills provide an interpretive history about life in the 1800s, while others simply provide a place to walk, take photos, or just enjoy the beauty and history of the Ozarks.

Historic Mills
Falling Spring Mill Missouri

Falling Spring Mill
36.8680167-91.2951167

  • 500,000 gallons per day

The Falling Spring area was homesteaded in 1851 by Thomas and Jane Brown of Tennessee. One of four houses built at this site, today, the Thomas Brown Cabin still stands. The current mill was constructed in 1927. Its overshot wheel was used for power to grind corn, saw shingles and firewood, as well as generate electricity. Looking inside the mill, one can still see some of the original machinery in place.

The spring provides 500,000 gallons of water per day. During the Civil War, it is believed that soldiers camped in the area. Falling Spring was so busy at times that 10 to 12 wagons would be camped alongside the road in front of the spring.

The area is managed by the U.S. Forest Service and is a day use area with picnic tables and pedestal grills.

https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/mtnf/recarea/?recid=21730

    

Falling Spring Mill Missouri
Falling Spring Mill Missouri
Falling Spring Mill
Falling Spring Mill
Falling Spring Mill

53 miles From West Plains

Take Highway 63 north toward Willow Springs. Just before Willow Springs, take Highway 60 east toward Mountain View. Stay on Highway 60 for 34 miles then turn right on Highway 19 south. In 8 miles, turn left onto County Road 3170 then left on County Road 3164. Travel 2.6 miles on gravel road and the parking lot for Falling Spring Mill will be on the right.

Make it a day Trip

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Falling Spring Mill Missouri
Falling Spring Mill Missouri